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All UCs are Walled-Garden Communities only with Rabbit Holes

April 5, 2013

ImageShould UC communities be erected with walls around them?  Why have a collaborative community that presumably has the ability to seamlessly interact but only among like platforms?  Frankly – the concept of a walled-garden UC community is akin to going down the rabbit hole in Alice in Wonderland and entering a fantasy world; only in this case, after the organization has gone down the rabbit hole, its end-users emerge in a world where UC vendors have blurred the distinction between fantasy and reality.  The reality is that all UC vendors have restricted connectivity options with other platforms, and there are a couple of reasons for these restrictions.

It is become abundantly clear that interoperability never was and never will become a priority to UC vendors.  Why should it?  The economics for each vendor doesn’t make sense, because by enabling interoperability, they each have to absorb the cost of providing it across their competitors’ platforms, and risk their customers switching into a competitors’ offering.

Connectivity itself though is not the only challenge either.  Even within their walled-garden communities, the bigger hurdle is to be able to find and connect to federation ready partners.

While there are many organizations out there who, like Alice, feel as though they are faced with a curious hall of locked doors of varying proportions, they need to look beyond UC vendors to provide them with seamless, secure, scalable, any-to-any federation capabilities.

NextPlane’s UC Exchange allows organizations to breakdown the artificial walls and extend their UC platform to realize the Unified Communications promise of doing real-time collaboration with strategic business partners, increasing efficiency, productivity, and competitive advantages.

Instead of feeling bewildered at which different sized door to open and walk through, consider NextPlane the Looking Glass – where organizations escape their UC’s walled-garden communities.

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